The Wine Warehouse

Additives

Acid Blend

Acid adjustment in fruit wines. Use in grape wines acceptable but not recommended due to difficulties manipulating malic acid and the possibility of malolactic activity. Consult a good winemaking textbook. 5 ml (one teaspoon) = approximately 4 g.

Acidex

Extreme de-acidification of musts and finished wines. Better choice for acid reductions than regular chalk (calcium carbonate) because it reduces equal amounts of malic and tartaric acid in the must. Acidex only works within a saturated solution so in practice a fraction of the must to be deacidified is drawn off, de-acidified, clarified, and returned to the main portion. This effectively dilutes the acidic must/wine. 5 ml (1 teaspoon) = approximately 2.2 g.

Bentonite

It is a form of clay. It is normally used as a preliminary fining agent in wine clarification. Small doses added to the must may speed fermentation by acting as a catalysis. The best time to use Bentonite is by adding it directly to the must before adding the yeast. Stir the Bentonite well in hot water as directed, then sir it into the must.

Citric Acid

Used to adjust acid levels in fruit wines and adjusting acid to taste in fully fermented grape wines. Also used in barrel care as an acidifier (lowers pH) when combined with sulphites in a rinsing solution. 5 ml (one teaspoon) = approximately 3.6 g.

CLARO KC (Kieselsol / Chitosan)

Claro KC is an impressive combination of kieselsol and chitosan. Both are fining agents that have proven to be very effective in clearing even the most troublesome hazes. Kieselsol works by creating strong negative charge. The chitosan creates a positive static charge. Both promotes the clumping and the falling out of yeast, proteins and the break down of haze causing substances.  Each package of Claro KC contains enough kieselsol and chitosan to clear 5  gallons/ 23 litres of wine.

Directions: Siphon wine off any sediment before using any fining agent. Gently stir into the wine the kieselsol. Wait 5 minutes. Then gently stir in the chitosan. Continue to stir the wine until both ingredients are evenly dispersed throughout. Allow the wine to clear for 7-14 days. Once wine has cleared, siphon off the rest of the sediment and it will then be ready to bottle.

Elderberries

Used in making specialty wine and as an additive to grape concentrate wines. Gives rich “plummy” flavour to wines, along with reddish brown colour. Adds tannin to bland wines. Add to wine prior to pitching yeast. Push under fermenting wine every day to keep berries moist. Leave berries behind in fermenter at first racking. Use 3-¼ g per litre of wine (75 g per 23 litres). 5 ml (one teaspoon) = approximately 2.5 g.

French Oak Ageing Compound

Used to add oak flavours and aromas to finished wines. Stir into wine immediately before bottling. For reds use 1 to 3 ml per litre of wine, for whites use ¼ to 1 ml per litre. Caution: Over-oaking is impossible to reverse. When in doubt, add to only half of the wine, saving the remainder for dilution in case of over-oaking.

French Oak Chips

Introduces desirable flavours and aromas into wine (including vanilla, smoke, and wood-like flavours) all associated with high-quality, barrel-aged wines. Add directly to finished wine* in secondary fermenter. Use approximately 50 g per 23 litres Leave two weeks and then taste the wine every two to three days. When desired oakiness is achieved, rack the wine into clean carboy. If not oaky enough add an additional 25-g per 23 litres and repeat the waiting and tasting period.

*This is for winemaking from fresh juice. If you are making a wine kit-please refer to the instructions for the time to add the oak chips.

Glycerine

Contributes “fullness” or “smoothness” when added to a wine. Glycerine also gives the wine “legs”, the viscous drips that run down the side of a glass in which wine is swirled. Stir in 3 to 15 ml per litre of wine immediately before bottling. Use a syringe to measure accurately.

LIQUID GRAPE TANNIN

Used to increasing astringency in grape or fruit wines. Some use as a clarifying agent in wine and beer; however, this has been superseded by the use of silicon dioxide. Consult winemaking textbook on usage.

MALIC ACID

Preparation of malolactic cultures. Potential use for acid adjustments in wine discouraged due to possible activation of malolactic activity along with strong ‘apple’ taste apparent in wines with high concentrations of malic acid. Consult a winemaking textbook for usage rates. 5 ml (one teaspoon) = approximately 4 g.

METABISULPHITE

This product helps to prevent oxidation, protects your wine from spoilage and aids in clearing. The product had been used in the wine industry for over 400 years. Used in moderation, it poses no health threats. A solution made by dissolving 50 grams of metabisulphite in 4 liters of water is an excellent sterilant for equipment and containers.

OAK CHIPS

Used to introduce desirable flavours and aromas into wine (including vanilla, smoke, and wood-like flavours) all associated with high-quality, barrel-aged wines. Add directly to finished wine in secondary fermenter. Use approximately 50 g per 23 litres Leave two weeks and then taste the wine every two to three days. When desired oakiness is achieved rack the wine into clean carboy. If not oaky enough add an additional 25-g per 23 litres and repeat the waiting and tasting period.

OAK POWDER

Adds oak flavour and aroma to wine. Chief advantage over regular oak chips lies in its use during primary fermentation. Oak flavours and aromas transfer very quickly and efficiently, allowing user to judge results within two to three weeks. Also improves early drinkablity of wines. Add directly to grape juice or must prior to or during fermentation. For whites and light reds use 25 g per 23 litres. For heavier reds use 50 g per 23 litres. 5 ml (one teaspoon) = approximately 1.4 g Caution: Over-oaking is impossible to reverse. When in doubt, use less oak, or only oak a portion of the wine, saving the rest to use for diluting.

PECTIC ENZYME

Dissolves pectin (long chain protein molecules) that may leave wines cloudy. Can also be used when making fruit wines, both to increase juice yield and help the wine clear properly. Use 3.5 g per 23 litres (about 0.7 g per Imperial gallon). Dissolve in a small amount of cold water and stir into must, juice, or wine. 5 ml (one teaspoon) = approximately 2.8 g.

POTASSIUM SORBATE

Inhibits the reproduction of yeast cells. Sorbate does not kill yeast cells but will prevent renewed fermentation when you sweeten a wine before bottling. It is important that you use no more or less than required.

SPARKOLLOID

Is extracted from seaweed and sold as a powder. It is an excellent general purpose fining agent. But it has to be pre-mixed with wine and boil. This one will take approximately 10 days to clear your wine.

TANNIN

Used to increase astringency in grape or fruit wines. Some use as a clarifying agent; however this has been superseded by the use of silicon dioxide. Consult recipe for addition amounts. Dissolve powdered tannin in a small quantity of warmed wine before adding. 5 ml (one teaspoon) = approximately 2.2 g.

TARTARIC ACID

Used to make acid adjustments in wine. Acid of choice for all adjustments. Consult a good winemaking textbook for addition amounts. 5 ml (one teaspoon) = approximately 4 g.

YEAST ENERGISER

Provides essential minerals, trace nutrients and vitamins for yeast growth and metabolism during fermentation. Used to help start slow fermentation and to restart stuck ones. Add 0.4 g per litre (9 g per 23 litres) and stir gently. May cause foaming if added to an ongoing fermentation. 5 ml (one teaspoon) = approximately 3.7 g. Better choice than yeast nutrient which lacks some of the essential compounds needed to get sluggish yeast going.

YEAST NUTRIENT

Add to fermentation to increase yeast activity. Nitrogen compounds such as diammonium phosphate are vital to yeast metabolism. Should be added at beginning of fermentation, but could also be added towards the end of a slow or stuck fermentation. Ensures quick thorough fermentation. Add ¾ gram per litre to wine. 5 ml (1 teaspoon) = approximately 4.5 g.